Conflict

Undefined

Corruption in Nigeria’s Oil Sector – the Facts

The world’s 3rd largest exporter of crude, yet millions of Nigerians live in poverty. How does that really happen, where are the loopholes in the system, where exactly do Nigerians miss out on the oil bounty? Green Deal Nigeria author and insider expert of the Nigerian oil and gas industry, Lois Laraba Machunga-Disu lists the weaknesses of the industry and makes practical suggestions how to fix Nigeria’s oil problems. - Oil & Gas, Green Deal Nigeria study

For deeper insights, more technical information and analysis, consult the Technical Background Paper by Lois Laraba Machunga-Disu

 

By Lois Laraba Machunga-Disu

Singing Against Violence

Apart from being rich, famous, widely successful and being recipients of numerous national and international awards, what could Omawumi, M.I Abaga, Waje and ElDee have in common?

Well, we found out when the four of them came together to sing on one album and lend their voices to the cause of ending violence against women.

A woman in the desert

Increasing areas of northern Nigeria are turning into desert. With increasing climate change, these areas are facing heat above 45 degrees Celsius, soil degradation and shifting sand dunes. Hajia Waziri Toshua from Yobe State had to move her house twice to escape the sand dunes. Her father was not lucky: he died as the sand dunes encapsulated his house. Hear Hajiya talk about life in the desert. Watch Video

Imagine… Agriculture in 2030

105 words to inspire you to think of a thriving agriculture that has business incentives for small farmers using organic fertilizer, where soil fertility is a high priority and is protected in the interest of future generations, where researchers are connecting to farmers providing them with climate proof seeds… Where agriculture serves people, nature and wealth creation. Read More - Imagine Agriculture

Food vs People?

Nigeria’s 160 million people are projected to increase to 255 million by the year 2030. With desertification in the north, erosion and sea level rise along the Atlantic coast and more floods, will Nigeria be able to feed itself? With almost half of the country’s arable land not cultivated, there is a real possibility to increase food production. But how should Nigeria’s future agriculture look like? Green Deal Nigeria author Prof Chinedum Nwajiuba argues that sustainable agriculture is possible if small farmers are not left behind.

By Professor Chinedum Nwajiuba

Oil Communities in Niger Delta Bemoan lack of Development

Local communities in Nigeria’s oil-rich Niger Delta have complained about lack of development projects in their area says a report commissioned by the Heinrich Boell Stiftung (HBS) in Nigeria. “DESOPADEC has not done anything to improve our lives” says a resident of Iwhrekan community in Delta State. The HBS report critically assessed the extent to which Oil and Gas Development Commissions in the Niger Delta have been able to contribute to poverty reduction, livelihood improvement, and economic development in the region.

Conflict in Nigeria

What happens if Nigeria continues with business-as-usual, allowing resource scarcities and uneven distribution of income from natural resources to foster conflict and strife? A troubling picture emerges where extreme drought and excessive rains force millions of people to migrate, looking for food, shelter and employment. Green Deal Nigeria author Huzi Mshelia looks at the conflict implications of climate change.   Read More - Conflict, Green Deal Nigeria study

By Huzi Ishaku Mshelia

Addressing Nigerian food insecurity and agricultural Production in a Changing Climate

Nigeria’s food security situation is characterised by the threat of hunger and poverty, which confronts the 69 percent of the population that lives on less than Naira 100 (US$ 0.7) per day.Smallholder farmers account for 80 percent of all farm holdings, but crop yields are far below potentials.
This is due to inadequate access to and low uptake of high quality seeds and inefficient production systems, leading to regular shortfalls in production.
By Professor Chinedum Nwajiuba

Tackling the resource curse in the Niger Delta

This study looks at the Oil Commissions in some Niger Delta states, which were set up 10 years ago in order to ensure that the oil wealth trickles down to the communities living in oil producing areas. How is the Commissions’ work impacting on the lives of these communities? Do they work in a transparent manner? What is their self-perception? Uwafiokun Idemudia is Assistant Professor of Development Studies and Director of the African Studies Programme at the York University in Toronto, Canada. He visited the states of Delta, Edo and Ondo in 2011 for this study.

 

 

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