Desertification

Undefined

People, Profit, Planet

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A green budget for Jigawa State

Taking the concrete case of a typical Jigawa State annual budget, this report charts an alternative vision which takes into account the long-term cost of environmental damage and of underdeveloping the local economy. The green solutions in this report include replacing chemical with organic fertiliser, thereby creating more than 1,000 local jobs; the report also calculates the benefits of buying solar irrigation pumps rather than diesel powered pumps – resulting in savings of more than N 12 billion over a decade.

A woman in the desert

Increasing areas of northern Nigeria are turning into desert. With increasing climate change, these areas are facing heat above 45 degrees Celsius, soil degradation and shifting sand dunes. Hajia Waziri Toshua from Yobe State had to move her house twice to escape the sand dunes. Her father was not lucky: he died as the sand dunes encapsulated his house. Hear Hajiya talk about life in the desert. Watch Video

Imagine… Agriculture in 2030

105 words to inspire you to think of a thriving agriculture that has business incentives for small farmers using organic fertilizer, where soil fertility is a high priority and is protected in the interest of future generations, where researchers are connecting to farmers providing them with climate proof seeds… Where agriculture serves people, nature and wealth creation. Read More - Imagine Agriculture

Food vs People?

Nigeria’s 160 million people are projected to increase to 255 million by the year 2030. With desertification in the north, erosion and sea level rise along the Atlantic coast and more floods, will Nigeria be able to feed itself? With almost half of the country’s arable land not cultivated, there is a real possibility to increase food production. But how should Nigeria’s future agriculture look like? Green Deal Nigeria author Prof Chinedum Nwajiuba argues that sustainable agriculture is possible if small farmers are not left behind.

By Professor Chinedum Nwajiuba

Destroying what feeds you

Millions of trees are fired and wasted under Nigerian cooking pots as many women still cook on three-stone fires. Cooking with fire wood has destroyed large sways of Nigerian forest cover, which is under threat of extinction today. Mallam Adamu Mbar Yelwa is a 78 year old citizen of Taraba state. He remembers the days when clouds were hanging low over Yelwa forests, providing the people of the area with fresh air and lots of animals. Watch Video

Farming in the desert

The scientific language is clear: over the past 105 years, the amount of rainfall per year dropped by 81 mm. The trend of declining rainfall worsened after 1970 and continues to this date. Between 1941 and 2000, average temperatures increased by an alarming 1.4-1.9 degrees Celsius. But what does it mean to young Nigerians when the rains don’t come any longer? Hear Yusuf Darama from Yobe State describe his generation’s lack of perspective. Watch Video 

Come and chop!

It’s what people say when they invite someone to share their meal: in Nigeria, you ‘chop’ food as you dig your fingers into some delicious pounded yam with egusi stew. Alas, most Nigerians are not aware that by eating food, they usually chop down trees, too. As most Nigerian meals are still prepared on the traditional three-stone fire, the nation’s forest cover has been reduced to 5 per cent of its original size. Environmental journalist Ugochi Anyaka on Nigeria’s deforestation crisis..

By Ugochi Anyaka

The baker and the tree

In the northern Nigerian state of Jigawa, the demand for firewood for baking bread has resulted in unsustainable felling of trees. This has further accentuated the problem of desert encroachment. Watch this video and contact us on info@ng.boell.org if you have a solution.

Stop cutting down trees!

Getting young and enthusiastic converts to join the fight against climate change, global warming and unsustainable environmental practices requires taking the message to their door steps. A conversation club in Gembu, Taraba state introduces young scholars to the realities and concepts of environmental protection. Watch video

Gender and Climate Change in Nigeria

Climate change is one of the most urgent issues of our time with widespread implications for the earth’s ecosystems and human development across sectors. Although gender equality and women’s empowerment are acknowledged pre-requisites for sustainable development, climate change policies neglect these important issues. The Heinrich Böll Foundation commissioned this study to assess the impact of climate change on local communities from a gender perspective as well as make recommendation on how to combat the local consequences (adaptation measures) using the relevant local institutions/agents which also needed to be identified.

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