Energy Efficiency

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Solar powered water in Edo State

In Amakpa community in Edo state, Solar panels have powered a borehole for the past four years. The experience has been without hitches, a win-win for the villagers as Adesesde Oghademegbe explains in this short video. Watch video

The Energy Giant of Africa?

Nigeria’s renewable energy industry is tiny by all means, despite excellent conditions for electricity production from solar, small hydro and biomass sources. If Nigeria covered only 1% of its land mass with solar panels, it could produce 192,000 megawatts of power, compared to the 4,000 megawatts that are currently available on the national grid. In his contribution to the Green Deal Nigeria study, Huzi Mshelia describes the manifold efforts on energy policy and regulation, which have so far resulted in little results.

By Huzi Ishaku Mshelia

Let’s talk about… cow dung, baby

Out of 160 million Nigerians, about 100 million are still waiting for electricity. The 40% national grid makes large-scale rural development almost impossible to achieve. Renewable energies can provide power to millions of people in Nigeria, as the country has enough sun, small water ways, wind and biomass to produce 200,000 mega watts or more. But there is lack of awareness and of large-scale government support. This video is meant to increase awareness of renewable energies as cheap sources of reliable power. Watch Video

Papaya Power

Forty per cent of Nigerian agricultural products ends up as waste. Fruit and vegetables at the famous Mile 12 market in Lagos are no exemption, despite the fact that Lagos’ gastronomy and people depend on this market for their daily supplies. Aniche Phil-Ebosie sees money in this waste, and is using the rotting veg to produce gas, which he turns into electricity for the market stalls. Watch Video

A Green Deal for All

Why does Nigeria have to become ‘green’? Many might say that Nigeria needs development of any kind whatsoever to raise people out of poverty and start industrial development. Lead author of the Green Deal Nigeria study, international climate expert Hans Verolme, explains the international context and argues that a Green Deal is not a luxury, but an immediate necessity. Read

By Hans Verolme

Come and chop!

It’s what people say when they invite someone to share their meal: in Nigeria, you ‘chop’ food as you dig your fingers into some delicious pounded yam with egusi stew. Alas, most Nigerians are not aware that by eating food, they usually chop down trees, too. As most Nigerian meals are still prepared on the traditional three-stone fire, the nation’s forest cover has been reduced to 5 per cent of its original size. Environmental journalist Ugochi Anyaka on Nigeria’s deforestation crisis..

By Ugochi Anyaka

The baker and the tree

In the northern Nigerian state of Jigawa, the demand for firewood for baking bread has resulted in unsustainable felling of trees. This has further accentuated the problem of desert encroachment. Watch this video and contact us on info@ng.boell.org if you have a solution.

Imagine..Conflict

..a country where conflict has reduced because oil is no longer the main source of wealth- for- a- few, but where young people can access economic growth in different sectors such as renewable energy, agriculture, manufacturing and transport. Marrying a farmer is fashionable as it provides security for a small family.

Action Points

What should be done?

The National Planning Commission should do a climate review of Vision 20:2020, and consult with Nigerians on a greener Vision 2030.

Local governments need to start research on their clean energy potentials.

The Standards Organisation of Nigeria needs to enforce regulation that stops the importation of sub-standard renewable energy technology.

Our waste can be turned into cooking gas, or electricity. There is money to be made from 'rubbish'. Banks should understand the renewables industry and offer packages for young entrepreneurs at single digit interest rates.

Unprofessional installation of solar and other systems make the systems fail. A large scale training and research programme is needed to prepare Nigeria for green growth. The money could come from the Crude Excess Account, from the Sovereign Wealth Fund or from the PTDF. see Clean Energy, Green Deal Nigeria study

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