Farmers

Undefined

Organic farming in Nigeria

Nigerian agriculture relies heavily on synthetic or nitrogen fertiliser, and the Federal Ministry of Agriculture is trying to facilitate the growth of an internationally viable fertiliser industry in Nigeria. However, not many farmers know about organic fertiliser and how it can protect soil fertility over a long period of time. The Green Deal Nigeria team interviewed two organic farmers who seem to be ahead of their time:

Imagine… Agriculture in 2030

105 words to inspire you to think of a thriving agriculture that has business incentives for small farmers using organic fertilizer, where soil fertility is a high priority and is protected in the interest of future generations, where researchers are connecting to farmers providing them with climate proof seeds… Where agriculture serves people, nature and wealth creation. Read More - Imagine Agriculture

Action Points for Agriculture

Governments at local and state level need to map agricultural potentials of their areas and offer farmers advice based on research from national and international agencies.

Irrigation powered by renewable energy can reduce unemployment, hunger and poverty in the most remote areas. Capital budgets at state level should be spent on irrigation systems based on renewable energies.

Desertification can be contained with Re-Greening techniques. Government, farming and civil society representatives should visit Niger to learn from their experience of re-greening even barren land.

Destroying what feeds you

Millions of trees are fired and wasted under Nigerian cooking pots as many women still cook on three-stone fires. Cooking with fire wood has destroyed large sways of Nigerian forest cover, which is under threat of extinction today. Mallam Adamu Mbar Yelwa is a 78 year old citizen of Taraba state. He remembers the days when clouds were hanging low over Yelwa forests, providing the people of the area with fresh air and lots of animals. Watch Video

Agricultural insurance for women farmers

‘’My village is missing ...God save us’’. This was a blackberry personal message put up by my blackberry contact Khalid with a display photo of what used to be his village. All I saw was water covered buildings, with only some roofs spared... Yusuf Haliru describes how agricultural insurance can help farmers protect their business.

#BetterHarvestThroughKnowledge

Not many Nigerian farmers are on twitter, but those who have started networking to get up-to date information on climate change adaptation, are turning in bigger harvests. Unfortunately, despite the fact that 60% of the population are into farming,the majority of Nigerian peasant farmers do not have adequate knowledge. Only 5% have access to improved seeds. But the farmers from Owelli court community of Enugu state have been working with the NGO Tubali on networking and their state government has made information available to them Watch Video

Gender and Climate Change in Nigeria

Climate change is one of the most urgent issues of our time with widespread implications for the earth’s ecosystems and human development across sectors. Although gender equality and women’s empowerment are acknowledged pre-requisites for sustainable development, climate change policies neglect these important issues. The Heinrich Böll Foundation commissioned this study to assess the impact of climate change on local communities from a gender perspective as well as make recommendation on how to combat the local consequences (adaptation measures) using the relevant local institutions/agents which also needed to be identified.

Download publication (PDF, 71 pages, 2.9 MB)

Addressing Nigerian food insecurity and agricultural Production in a Changing Climate

Nigeria’s food security situation is characterised by the threat of hunger and poverty, which confronts the 69 percent of the population that lives on less than Naira 100 (US$ 0.7) per day.Smallholder farmers account for 80 percent of all farm holdings, but crop yields are far below potentials.
This is due to inadequate access to and low uptake of high quality seeds and inefficient production systems, leading to regular shortfalls in production.
By Professor Chinedum Nwajiuba

Pages