Sustainable cities

Undefined

Living off The Grid In Nigeria

Many Nigerians have grown skeptical about the power of solar. The general impression is that solar energy cannot provide a lot of power, that ‘it’s not bright’ and that it breaks down after just a few months. One solar engineer in the capital city of Abuja has gone all the way to demonstrate that this impression is wrong: He has built a block of apartments which are run entirely on renewable energy.

The Energy Giant of Africa?

Nigeria’s renewable energy industry is tiny by all means, despite excellent conditions for electricity production from solar, small hydro and biomass sources. If Nigeria covered only 1% of its land mass with solar panels, it could produce 192,000 megawatts of power, compared to the 4,000 megawatts that are currently available on the national grid. In his contribution to the Green Deal Nigeria study, Huzi Mshelia describes the manifold efforts on energy policy and regulation, which have so far resulted in little results.

By Huzi Ishaku Mshelia

Let’s talk about… cow dung, baby

Out of 160 million Nigerians, about 100 million are still waiting for electricity. The 40% national grid makes large-scale rural development almost impossible to achieve. Renewable energies can provide power to millions of people in Nigeria, as the country has enough sun, small water ways, wind and biomass to produce 200,000 mega watts or more. But there is lack of awareness and of large-scale government support. This video is meant to increase awareness of renewable energies as cheap sources of reliable power. Watch Video

Eko Atlantic City - Development for All?

The Eko Atlantic project is portrayed by Lagos State Government and developers as a model of sustainability, climate change adaptation and economic growth. However, reconciling plans for economic development and environmental protection with the aim of achieving social justice for all requires more open debate and participatory planning.

Wrath of the Sea Goddess

Sea level rise is damaging the Atlantic coast between Megacity Lagos and Calabar towards Cameroon, eating away up to 30 meters of coastline every year. Fishing communities have moved inland, but are now running out of options as they are encroaching on built lands and communities. Is it all the fault of humans angering the Sea Goddess? Watch video to hear the perspectives of residents of Alfa Beach community in Lagos.

Makoko Solutions: Floating School

Kunle Adeyemi, a Nigerian architect based in Amsterdam, was equally fascinated by the way of living of the Makoko community. He argues that Makoko and other water communities embody a unique synthesis of socio-political relations, economic networks, architecture and spatial presence that collectively push at the frontiers of urbanism. The “Floating School” which he developed and built in collaboration with the community opened an international debate on visionary forms of architecture to adapt to the challenges of flood and population growth

By Kunle Adeyemi

Paddling on the highway

Nigeria has been hit by unprecedented flooding in October 2012. With large sways of land under water, the question of food security is being discussed afresh. Under increasing climate stress and with more extreme weathers, flooding is likely to increase over the coming years. Listen to Adamu Umar as he is paddling on the Lokoja-Abuja express road. Watch Video

Green Deal Nigeria – The Project

Green Deal Nigeria is an initiative aimed at creating a debate on greener development options for Nigeria. Whether young, jobless, banker, market woman or politician- Green Deal Nigeria wants all of these to debate where Nigeria should go in terms of economic growth and social justice. After the Occupy movement, how can Nigerian citizens influence politics and development in a country with high levels of corruption and low levels of policy implementation?

 

Conflict in Nigeria

What happens if Nigeria continues with business-as-usual, allowing resource scarcities and uneven distribution of income from natural resources to foster conflict and strife? A troubling picture emerges where extreme drought and excessive rains force millions of people to migrate, looking for food, shelter and employment. Green Deal Nigeria author Huzi Mshelia looks at the conflict implications of climate change.   Read More - Conflict, Green Deal Nigeria study

By Huzi Ishaku Mshelia

Imagine..Conflict

..a country where conflict has reduced because oil is no longer the main source of wealth- for- a- few, but where young people can access economic growth in different sectors such as renewable energy, agriculture, manufacturing and transport. Marrying a farmer is fashionable as it provides security for a small family.

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