Nigeria Coal

Coal Atlas Nigeria: Introduction

How much coal should Nigeria burn to increase electricity supplies for the country? Is coal economically viable, and what health hazards does it bring to Nigerians? The Nigeria Coal Atlas has relevant facts & figures from domestic and international sources.

By Christine K

CLIMATE CHANGE: A 2 Degrees Warmer Nigeria

Coal is pure carbon. It is the most intense carbon emitter. How will Nigeria look like in a decade or two, if carbon emissions continue unabated and if the planet warms by 2 degrees Celsius? Christine K of the Heinrich Böll Foundation Nigeria has compiled these snapshots of how climate change is already affecting Nigeria today, from north to south, and what is to come if carbon emissions continue to rise.

By Christine K

INTERVIEW: Power vs People?

Hard Talk between Ambassador Joseph Ayalogu, Executive Director Corporate Relations of ETA Zuma Group, the company that holds licences for coal mining and coal power plants in Kogi State, and Nnimmo Bassey, Director of the Health of Mother Earth Foundation, who advocates for ‘leaving coal in the hole’ and opposes extraction. Will coal push Nigeria into the industrial age? Or will it leave host communities as impoverished and polluted as some communities in the Niger Delta? The Hard Talk was moderated by Christine K, Director of the Heinrich Böll Foundation Nigeria.

SUBSIDIES: Hidden Payments, Unpaid Bills

The coal industry uses taxpayers’ money to keep its prices low – and it does not compensate for the costs of climate change or disease. A brief look at the scale of the problem. A chapter from the Coal Atlas.

By Arne Jungjohann, Stefanie Groll, Lili Fuhr

NATURE: A Contaminated Future

Open-cast mining destroys the landscape of both the pit and the surrounding area. Efforts to restore these areas often fail and the surface above the underground mines sinks. A chapter from the Coal Atlas.

By Eva Mahnke

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