Energy

Undefined

Not All That Glitters: Nigeria's Bitumen Story.

As conventional oil reserves decline, international oil companies are increasingly turning their attention towards unconventional oils such as bitumen to meet rising demand for petroleum products. Bitumen, a very heavy oil, can be removed from the oil sands and used in road construction or upgraded into synthetic crude oil.  With an estimated 38 billion barrels of bitumen across Lagos, Ondo, Ogun, and Lagos states, Nigeria ranks 6th globally among countries with bitumen reserves.

Armsfree Ajanaku has travelled to Ondo state communities situated along the bitumen belt of Nigeria to try and understand the people’s perception about the bitumen under their feet and their aspiration for development. He describes his experience in this article. 

Corruption in Nigeria’s Oil Sector – the Facts

The world’s 3rd largest exporter of crude, yet millions of Nigerians live in poverty. How does that really happen, where are the loopholes in the system, where exactly do Nigerians miss out on the oil bounty? Green Deal Nigeria author and insider expert of the Nigerian oil and gas industry, Lois Laraba Machunga-Disu lists the weaknesses of the industry and makes practical suggestions how to fix Nigeria’s oil problems. - Oil & Gas, Green Deal Nigeria study

For deeper insights, more technical information and analysis, consult the Technical Background Paper by Lois Laraba Machunga-Disu

 

By Lois Laraba Machunga-Disu

The Energy Giant of Africa?

Nigeria’s renewable energy industry is tiny by all means, despite excellent conditions for electricity production from solar, small hydro and biomass sources. If Nigeria covered only 1% of its land mass with solar panels, it could produce 192,000 megawatts of power, compared to the 4,000 megawatts that are currently available on the national grid. In his contribution to the Green Deal Nigeria study, Huzi Mshelia describes the manifold efforts on energy policy and regulation, which have so far resulted in little results.

By Huzi Ishaku Mshelia

Action Points

 What needs to be done for Nigerians to reap the benefits of their wealth in oil and gas? 3 action points:                         

Federal Government of Nigeria: Stop gas flaring now, and open the gas market to commercial ownership of exploration, pipeline transmission and distribution.                  

Civil Society: Demand the creation of a new governance for the energy sector, integrating regulations for oil, gas and renewable energies in a Federal Energy Commission.

You: Attend public hearings on the Petroleum Industry Bill and demand clarity on the proposed management system of the gas sector. Host communities should receive royalties from the gas explored on their lands and government should receive income from taxing the commercial gas operators. We do not need derivation arrangements.

(more details in Green Deal Nigeria study).

Let’s talk about… cow dung, baby

Out of 160 million Nigerians, about 100 million are still waiting for electricity. The 40% national grid makes large-scale rural development almost impossible to achieve. Renewable energies can provide power to millions of people in Nigeria, as the country has enough sun, small water ways, wind and biomass to produce 200,000 mega watts or more. But there is lack of awareness and of large-scale government support. This video is meant to increase awareness of renewable energies as cheap sources of reliable power. Watch Video

Papaya Power

Forty per cent of Nigerian agricultural products ends up as waste. Fruit and vegetables at the famous Mile 12 market in Lagos are no exemption, despite the fact that Lagos’ gastronomy and people depend on this market for their daily supplies. Aniche Phil-Ebosie sees money in this waste, and is using the rotting veg to produce gas, which he turns into electricity for the market stalls. Watch Video

Eko Atlantic City - Development for All?

The Eko Atlantic project is portrayed by Lagos State Government and developers as a model of sustainability, climate change adaptation and economic growth. However, reconciling plans for economic development and environmental protection with the aim of achieving social justice for all requires more open debate and participatory planning.

Makoko Solutions: Floating School

Kunle Adeyemi, a Nigerian architect based in Amsterdam, was equally fascinated by the way of living of the Makoko community. He argues that Makoko and other water communities embody a unique synthesis of socio-political relations, economic networks, architecture and spatial presence that collectively push at the frontiers of urbanism. The “Floating School” which he developed and built in collaboration with the community opened an international debate on visionary forms of architecture to adapt to the challenges of flood and population growth

By Kunle Adeyemi

Green jobs

What would young Nigerians do if they had enough electricity…? They would work. A youth research commissioned by hbs Nigeria quotes a young man from Enugu, “If there is steady light in the country, that means there will be lots of competition in manufacturing of goods and so many products”. Nigeria’s 4,000 mega watt of power are under-serving the population massively, as electricity demand is expected to rise to 192,000 mega watt in the next twenty years. Tinyan Ogiehor is a solar entrepreneur in Abuja who went into his renewable energy business because he saw how crippling the constant power black-outs were for the IT industry. Watch Video

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